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 Liberalism and the Decay of Society: are Humans Imperfect?

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FleurDeLis
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PostSubject: Liberalism and the Decay of Society: are Humans Imperfect?   Thu Sep 29, 2011 8:22 pm

Fair warning; long read!!!

Liberation and Decay of Society: Are Humans imperfect?

The ideology of liberalism suggests that all humans are capable of rational thought despite their passions and desires, thus, should be allowed to enjoy as much freedom, and as little government interference, as possible. A widely held conservative notion, in contrast, states that “human nature is inherently flawed, the secular equivalent to original sin,” (Miller, 1987); in essence, humans are said to be imperfect, controlled not by rational thought, but by their passions and desires. Liberation from governmental or clerical doctrine then, causes the decay of moral; moreover, it causes the decay of society.

The Religious Right, a right wing conservative movement, has tried to halt liberation and the separation of church and state in the Unites States (U.S.) since the beginning of the twentieth century. Charles Darwin had published his book, Origins of Species, in November of 1859, describing “...descent with modification”; in the sixth edition of his book, however, he began using the term Evolution instead. The theory of evolution as proposed by Darwin, gave rise to the debate, Intelligent Design vs. Evolution at the beginning of the twentieth century; the church opposed to teaching evolution in American schools. The theory of intelligent design, unlike the theory of evolution, is not entirely based on science; intelligent design takes scientific findings that explain nature into account, but it proposes the possibility of unnatural causes; causes that cannot be explained through science. Although the controversy about teaching evolution in American schools lasted for decades, the Religious Right did not gain significant exposure until the 1960s. The quickly advancing liberation in the U.S. after World War II, was followed by a recorded increase in deviant behavior; crime, abortion, and divorce rates rose quickly, while marriage and birth rates declined. In response, the Religious Right urged the nation to return to moral and obedience in an effort to protect society from decay.

Religious Leaders in the Middle East now too, fear liberation and urge their people to utmost caution. Frequently, they quote excerpts of the Qur'an containing the purpose of the Jihad, calling their nation to protect itself, and to stand up against the western forces of liberation. Iran’s Supreme Leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, openly thanked Hamas activist for their resistance in Israel; "The only way to succeed is to continue resistance against the occupier regime," Khamenei stated (Wilson, 2006). In Iraq, U.S. Operation Iraqi Freedom, introduced “western” liberation; while the questionable stability and might of the new Iraqi government can be held responsible for the increase in crime they currently experience, the surge of pornography reflects upon their people’s desire. No crime is committed by owning or viewing pornography, but it shows that long held, unwritten laws of prudence are beginning to fade.

Liberalism, however, does not promise absolute freedom, nor does it aim to increase forms of deviance. Instead, liberalism aims to create as much freedom for the individual within a society as possible. In every liberation movement, an oppressive force is perceived. Since the eighteenth century, liberation has fought against oppression and exploitation; inequalities based on status, gender, and race, began to dissolve. Gay, animal, and environmental liberation are current liberation ideologies found in several countries that already experienced a great deal of liberation. Emerged from the Enlightenment Movement, liberalism suggests that the application of reason and rational thought will cure society of ignorance and error; liberation will improve society (Ball & Dagger, 2007). Therefore, liberation does not decay society, it merely changes it; liberation is the evolution of society.

The amount of liberation a country experiences, influences its economy; a high rate of female literacy for instance, is found in the nations with the highest Gross Domestic Product (GDP) and the least agricultural employment. A low rate of agricultural employment implies that a country is in the tertiary, or possibly quaternary, stage of economical development. The industry there is not focused on obtaining raw materials, nor does is manufacture much from raw materials anymore; instead, the industry provides services, such as legal consultation, medical treatments, or banking (tertiary stage), and it provides education and research (quaternary stage). Lesser developed countries (LDCs), countries in the primary or secondary stage of economical development, have a low female literacy rate and a high rate of agricultural employment (CIA Fact-book, 2002). Their industry is marked by the obtainment of raw materials (primary stage), and the conversion from raw materials into simple goods (secondary stage).

A quick glance at international statistics reveals that crime, abortion, and divorce rates, in largely liberated countries (France, Germany, Sweden, U.S.,...), have been rising over the past 50 years, whereas crude birth, and marriage rates declined. The Seventh United Nations Survey covering international crime statistics from 1998 to 2000, places Finland, Denmark, the United Kingdom (U.K.), the U.S., and the Netherlands within the ten highest crime-rates out of sixty countries; Germany, Canada, Norway, France, Italy, Switzerland, and Spain, are ranked among the highest thirty. However, higher total crimes per capita, can be a sign for advanced legislature and law-enforcement (human rights, traffic, and business laws), as well as a nations willingness to cooperate in reporting crimes. Since most liberated nations belong to the more developed countries (MDCs), they have a well-developed legislature and law-enforcement, and their population is willing to report crimes, as law-enforcement is seen as an asset to ensuring ones own freedom.

Although the total crime rate per capita is comparably high in liberated nations, a crime statistic specific to murder and brutal crime, ranks most liberated MCDs in the bottom third of sixty nations that submitted data to the United Nations (U.N.) for evaluation. Murder-rates range from 0.009 per capita (Switzerland, on rank fifty six) to 0.017 (France, on rank forty); except, Finland with a murder rate of 0.028 on rank thirty, and the U.S. with a murder-rate of 0.042 on rank twenty-four. The highest murder-rates, however, are found in nations that have experienced little or no liberation, such as South Africa (0.5).

Most Sociologists contribute the high murder-rate in the U.S. to the nations emphasis on individual liberty, and laws that allow citizens to own and keep personal guns. Steven Spitzer (1980), Professor of Sociology at the University of Suffolk, however, argues that capitalism labels that deviant, which threatens or questions its structure. A poor man who steals from a rich family is called deviant and put in jail, but the rich man who exploits the poor and steals from them, is unlikely to carry the stigma of deviance (Macionis, 2007). How often do we hear about the dubious or downright illegal actions our leadership performs? And how often do we see them go to jail for their betrayal of society? Former Illinois governor, Rod Blagojevich, who tried to sell President Obama’s senate seat in 2008, for instance, spent the day of his indictment with his family at Disney World.

Recent international statistics concerning abortions place most liberated nations at the bottom of the range, implying that the abortion rates are low in liberated countries; however, this statistic offers little comparison, only nineteen nations worldwide, submitted data to the U.N. for evaluation (United Nations, 2008). One aspect influencing abortion statistics is the legal status of abortion; illegal abortions are unlikely to be reported for statistical purposes. A countries culture and economy also influences abortion-rates. High abortion rates in Russia are said to be related to the harsh living conditions; mothers do not know how to care for themselves and the child. In China, however, an overpopulated nation that has slowly become more liberated since 1976, the One-Child-Policy has caused many mothers to abort their unborn female babies. Each Chinese couple is only allowed to have one child; failure to comply can result in penalty fees, pressure to abort, and forced sterilization (Elegant, 2007). Unlike sons, daughters do not provide any social security or benefit for the Chinese family, instead, they leave the family upon reaching maturity to live with and work for, the in-law family. Having one female baby is costly for a Chinese family and offers no economical support for the future, therefore, mothers choose to abort, abandon, or neglect their female babies.

Although conservatives like to link the decline in the crude birth rate to the decline in martial commitments, the birth rate in MDCs has been declining steadily since the industrialization pulled women into the workforce. Inadequate life quality, as well as hard and dangerous labor in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, made child-bearing and child-survival more difficult. Modernization (i.e. contraceptives) and the advancing female liberation during the later twentieth century contributed to the decline in birth rate. Although living conditions and work environments had improved greatly, women now had the opportunity to excel in their careers and to become independent; status, freedom, success, and wealth became more desirable than being confined to kitchen and motherhood. Couples in liberated MDCs still live together today, but they are less inclined to make a martial commitment or to have children. However, according to Thomas Malthus, English economist and clergy, exponential population growth will lead to social chaos; at some point, the population will exceed the natural resources needed to sustain itself.

Whether the decrease in martial commitment relates to the decline in birth rate or not, conservatives see another threat arising from the decline in marriages; the decay of family. “It is the birthright of every child to be raised by their mother and father. To redefine marriage is to rob children of that birthright”, state Jeff Kemp and Harvey Drake Jr. in their article “Marriage Still Matters to Washington's Children” in the Seattle Times (October 2004); this op-ed piece appeared as an answer to judicial rulings in favor of gay-marriage, an aspect of gay-liberation. Kempt and Drake continue:
“Changing marriage sends both boys and girls the message that a mom or a dad isn't necessary. Lawyers and judges will have made a whole new parenting structure the legal norm. Are we really prepared to send the message that women — moms — are not necessary in a child's life? Or that dads are no longer needed? ... Children are confused enough about where they fit in society. If they come from homes missing one gender or the other, and society tells them this is ideal, it is more difficult for them to learn what it means to be a good mother or father, or what it takes to be a good spouse”.
Reality, however, appears to paint a different picture. Generation X, also known as the latchkey generation, the first generation to be exposed to increased divorce-rates and daycare facilities, is said to be the generation with the highest degree of education. Generation X children gave birth to Generation Y, a generation said to be highly sophisticated and versatile; a generation that has already adapted to the fast pace of modernization. Generation Z, today’s children, is expected to be even more sophisticated once grown to maturity.

Although it is a very common belief in the West, that monogamous pair-bonding for life is natural, it is more of a social necessity than a natural occurrence. The thought that one man belongs to one women and they ought to have a family, is not shared worldwide. Polygamy, for instance, is an opposing perspective supported and executed by a few countries, as well as a few groups living incognito in countries where polygamy is illegal; it is estimated that thirty to fifty-thousand practicing polygamists currently reside in the U.S. In Middle Eastern countries, in contrast, polygamy is a legal, celebrated ideal and a God given task; humans there, pursue a different idea of perfection.

Who is to decide which norms are applied to society? Throughout the past, social norms were derived from cultural history and spiritual beliefs; this, however, had been strongly criticized during the Enlightenment, which led to separation from state and church in many countries. Karl Marx, founder of the socialist ideology, described religion as “The opium of the people”, a tool for the ruling class to keep their people complacent; religion urges one to accept the Will of God as superior to ones own, and promises salvation in an unknown afterlife, if one submits to the clerical doctrine. Susanne B. Anthony, famous for supporting female liberation and religious freedom in the late twentieth century, stated, ”The religious persecution of the ages has been done under what was claimed to be the command of God. I distrust those people who know so well what God wants them to do to their fellows, because it always coincides with their own desires.” A recent judicial ruling in California deemed the phrase “In God We Trust” on the U.S. Dollar, historical, therefore it shall not be removed from the U.S currency; in the Marxian context, the ruling would have deemed social inequality and exploitation as historical.

The absence of scientific proof makes it hard for every spiritual belief to maintain its hold on society and its government today; rational thought, science, and education have taken over, much like the concept of liberalism had intended. The American Religious Identification Survey (ARIS) showed that Protestants lost fourteen percent in 2001, while the category “No Religion” gained twenty-three percent. Moreover, the protestant movement, which had originally emerged as a splice from the Catholic Church, continues to split into sub-categories; the ARIS lists twelve religious traditions that have emerged from the protestant belief, whereas the Catholics have remained as a closed group under the Christian umbrella.
Edward O. Wilson, former Professor of Science at the University of Harvard, stated, “Although human progress can be achieved by intuition and force of will, only hard won empirical knowledge of our biological nature will allow us to make optimum choices among the competing criteria of progress.”(On human nature, 1978, p.6). The developing science from the past has provided us with several theories regarding our nature and its influence on society, some of which have been refuted already; Cesare Lombroso, claimed that criminals have an ape-like physical appearance (1876); William Sheldon, suggested that body-structure affects criminal behavior (1949). Over time, however, scientists gained the understanding that more than our biological nature is influencing our behavior; sociobiology emerged as a discipline in which science as well as sociology and psychology are used to explain human social behavior. A twenty-five year long genetic study from the University of Wisconsin, for instance, noted in 2003 that genetics in combination with environmental factors, such as child-hood abuse or neglect, are strong predicators for future criminal or violent behavior.

Although we have observed the link between genes and behavior in the animal kingdom for almost two centuries, humans were reluctant to fully apply the same theory to themselves. For the past fifty years, however, sociobiology has found increasing agreement among scientists worldwide. E. Wilson, a leader among socio-biologists, relates human emotional responses to the limbic system, one of the oldest parts of our brain; he concludes, “Human emotional responses and the more general ethical practices based on them have been programmed to a substantial degree by natural selection over thousands of generations,”(On Human Nature, 1978, p.6) where natural selection assumes that the selection is based on the criteria of best fit; traits that are most successful at any given time, will be adopted and genetically integrated into the species.

In correlation to sociobiology stands biodiversity, the variations of life forms and the spectrum of the gene pool from which natural selection can make its choices; a broader spectrum provides more room for optimized choices and needed adaptations that may arise suddenly. In recent years, scientists have coined the term biodiversity-crisis as they noted a continuous decrease in biodiversity on earth. Such decrease in biodiversity, argue scientists, has occurred before, leading to mass extinctions; the last time, the decrease killed the dinosaurs.

Comparing international statistics to obtain information about the consequences of liberation only offers inconclusive result; societies are too complex to be judged by exclusive variables. A societies economic development influences the ability to obtain valid information from the populous, and the form of government depicts how such information is to be used. China for instance, still vastly influenced by its communist history, did not submit data to the U.N. for evaluation. Moreover, deviance is defined by cultural norms that do not apply to every nation; “Norms guide almost all human activities“(Macionis, Sociology, 2007), and nonconformity to such norms describes deviance. Emile Durkheim stated, “Today’s deviance can become tomorrow’s morality”; although Rock N’ Roll had been looked down upon in the 1950’s, it is now prospering industry (Macionis, Sociology, 2007). Perfection then, becomes a question of perception.

Although societies have been changing in structure and norm declarations, we have yet to see a modern society completely decay as a consequence of liberation. The progress that more developed societies have made within the last two-hundred years, however, can easily be contributed to liberation and individual development; objective research and education have led to ground-breaking findings that allowed humans to come thus far. Liberation helps scientific progress because it promotes opposing theories to arise; the struggle between the fields of study furthers the desire to obtain accurate information. Two-hundred years ago, nobody dreamed of personal digital assistants (PDAs), little handheld computers that allow you to connect worldwide at any point in time; or open heart surgery, a treatment option that can add a decade to a patients life-expectancy. Without the freedoms of choice, the ability to follow ones own ideas, these things would not have happened.

If we evolve from natural selection, and biodiversity is needed to maintain an ecological balance, it is important to choose the constraints we put on society carefully. Long held philosophies and beliefs about human nature, its potential, as well as possible flaws, need to be examined closely before we progress and integrate it into our species; life-long pair-bonding, for example, works against biodiversity. The reduction of the female role to “motherhood and kitchen” works in favor of the gene pool, as it provides genetic heritage, even if the heritage is limited in diversity; however, continuous expansion of the human populous threatens our resources and ecosystem. Liberation, on the other hand, by its nature, allows for a variety of genes and behavioral traits to emerge. E. Wilson stated, “ Human diversity is to be treasured, not merely tolerated, ... Discrimination against ethnic groups, homosexuals, and women is based on a complete misunderstanding of biological fact”. [center]
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PostSubject: Re: Liberalism and the Decay of Society: are Humans Imperfect?   Sun Oct 02, 2011 9:41 pm

FleurDeLis wrote:
Although the total crime rate per capita is comparably high in liberated nations, a crime statistic specific to murder and brutal crime, ranks most liberated MCDs in the bottom third of sixty nations that submitted data to the United Nations (U.N.) for evaluation. Murder-rates range from 0.009 per capita (Switzerland, on rank fifty six) to 0.017 (France, on rank forty); except, Finland with a murder rate of 0.028 on rank thirty, and the U.S. with a murder-rate of 0.042 on rank twenty-four. The highest murder-rates, however, are found in nations that have experienced little or no liberation, such as South Africa (0.5).

Something not taken into account is that the most advanced (liberated) countries wage most of the wars. Specifically, wars are waged over resources, which is what liberated countries need to survive. If those who die directly and indirectly from war were classified as murders, liberated countries would have a huge jump in their murder ratio. Tension inside a country is essentially redirected outside the country. In a sense, war is like exporting murder. This makes the presented statistics skewed, which the murder ratio between liberated countries and non-liberated countries is most likely near equal.

Non-liberated countries need an ever growing population to harvest the resources liberated countries use. If a non-liberated country ever became liberated, then that is a threat of turning a liberated country into a non-liberated country. Basically, a third world country must stay a third world country in order to maintain the status quo liberated countries enjoy.



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PostSubject: Re: Liberalism and the Decay of Society: are Humans Imperfect?   Sun Oct 02, 2011 11:09 pm

I guess you could count war victims as murder victims too; it seems odd but it does make sense.

However, I'm contrasting liberalism and conservatism ... liberal countries are not the war raging countries of this world; war is much more associated with conservative countries such as the U.S. (the buzz-word liberty does not make the U.S. a liberal country); coincidentally, the U.S., liberated as it is, still has a fairly high murder and brutal crime rate. Scandinavian countries, Switzerland, the Netherlands, or Canada, on the other hand, are in fact liberal countries and they have not fought wars in a long long time. Nor do they seem to need the means of war to sustain their resource supply.
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PostSubject: Re: Liberalism and the Decay of Society: are Humans Imperfect?   Sun Oct 02, 2011 11:18 pm

FleurDeLis wrote:
I guess you could count war victims as murder victims too; it seems odd but it does make sense.

However, I'm contrasting liberalism and conservatism ... liberal countries are not the war raging countries of this world; war is much more associated with conservative countries such as the U.S. (the buzz-word liberty does not make the U.S. a liberal country); coincidentally, the U.S., liberated as it is, still has a fairly high murder and brutal crime rate. Scandinavian countries, Switzerland, the Netherlands, or Canada, on the other hand, are in fact liberal countries and they have not fought wars in a long long time. Nor do they seem to need the means of war to sustain their resource supply.

Oopsy, I wasn't thinking in that context.

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PostSubject: Re: Liberalism and the Decay of Society: are Humans Imperfect?   Sun Oct 02, 2011 11:27 pm

Nice catch though ... the way I used that point was or is kinda misleading. And, I really didn't even think of war-victims in that context; although I don't associated war with liberal countries, it does skew the statistic I was looking at.
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PostSubject: Re: Liberalism and the Decay of Society: are Humans Imperfect?   Sun Oct 02, 2011 11:43 pm

Smiley wrote:
FleurDeLis wrote:
Although the total crime rate per capita is comparably high in liberated nations, a crime statistic specific to murder and brutal crime, ranks most liberated MCDs in the bottom third of sixty nations that submitted data to the United Nations (U.N.) for evaluation. Murder-rates range from 0.009 per capita (Switzerland, on rank fifty six) to 0.017 (France, on rank forty); except, Finland with a murder rate of 0.028 on rank thirty, and the U.S. with a murder-rate of 0.042 on rank twenty-four. The highest murder-rates, however, are found in nations that have experienced little or no liberation, such as South Africa (0.5).

Something not taken into account is that the most advanced (liberated) countries wage most of the wars. Specifically, wars are waged over resources, which is what liberated countries need to survive. If those who die directly and indirectly from war were classified as murders, liberated countries would have a huge jump in their murder ratio. Tension inside a country is essentially redirected outside the country. In a sense, war is like exporting murder. This makes the presented statistics skewed, which the murder ratio between liberated countries and non-liberated countries is most likely near equal.

Non-liberated countries need an ever growing population to harvest the resources liberated countries use. If a non-liberated country ever became liberated, then that is a threat of turning a liberated country into a non-liberated country. Basically, a third world country must stay a third world country in order to maintain the status quo liberated countries enjoy.



I like the lighting in here. So many stars I can't even make out a single consellation.

It's interesting that you use the term "liberated countries". Seems kind of narrow minded but maybe I'm missing something.

I also find it interesting that you judge human nature based on how the masses behave under the ebb and flow of political rule.

The easiest way to define human nature is to say that if a person is shown affection an positive attention along with guidence, from a group of adults, they will grow into sociably healthy adults.

There are cultures much older then the U.S. that hadn't had the need to come up with a word for war or weapon until westerners taught it to them. There are people who use bow and arrows, knives, crossbows and machetes, but refer to them as tools and have no words for weapons.

Human nature is to be receptive to the ways of your people and to grow into one of them.

I assume where the term "liberated country" is used, it means compared to the U.S. by the U.S.? The U.S. has held the title for murder capitol of the world for several decades. Ironicly Washington D.C. has been at the top more then once. E. Palo Alto, detroit, Miami, somewhere but always the U.S.

The United States of America has 25% of the worlds prisoner population. We incarcerate more of our own citizens then any other nation, liberated or not...by a long shot. Our citezens are some of the most overworked people on the planet, Australia slightly ahead on hours per week, yet we enjoy a lower quality of life then most "liberated countries".

The fact that people in there lives become consumed with their nations political parties , and become die hard liberals or conservatives should show you how flexiblable and ultimately reflective human nature is.
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PostSubject: Re: Liberalism and the Decay of Society: are Humans Imperfect?   Mon Oct 03, 2011 12:08 am

Born against wrote:


I like the lighting in here. So many stars I can't even make out a single consellation.

It's interesting that you use the term "liberated countries". Seems kind of narrow minded but maybe I'm missing something.

I also find it interesting that you judge human nature based on how the masses behave under the ebb and flow of political rule.

The easiest way to define human nature is to say that if a person is shown affection an positive attention along with guidence, from a group of adults, they will grow into sociably healthy adults.

There are cultures much older then the U.S. that hadn't had the need to come up with a word for war or weapon until westerners taught it to them. There are people who use bow and arrows, knives, crossbows and machetes, but refer to them as tools and have no words for weapons.

Human nature is to be receptive to the ways of your people and to grow into one of them.

I assume where the term "liberated country" is used, it means compared to the U.S. by the U.S.? The U.S. has held the title for murder capitol of the world for several decades. Ironicly Washington D.C. has been at the top more then once. E. Palo Alto, detroit, Miami, somewhere but always the U.S.

The United States of America has 25% of the worlds prisoner population. We incarcerate more of our own citizens then any other nation, liberated or not...by a long shot. Our citezens are some of the most overworked people on the planet, Australia slightly ahead on hours per week, yet we enjoy a lower quality of life then most "liberated countries".

The fact that people in there lives become consumed with their nations political parties , and become die hard liberals or conservatives should show you how flexiblable and ultimately reflective human nature is.

Na, I was quite literally thinking in a completely different context, non-political. When I used the term most advanced liberated, I was using it in terms of most advanced developed countries. That is why I mentioned third world countries i.e. level of economic development. Likewise, what I was talking about was more in relation to psychology, which is why I was saying in developed countries tension is essentially exported. Anyhow, what I said doesn't really fit with the discussion.

Oh, and welcome to the forum. Smile

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PostSubject: Re: Liberalism and the Decay of Society: are Humans Imperfect?   Mon Oct 03, 2011 12:33 am

Thanks for the welcome Very Happy

I tend to think of developed countries as enslaved to the systems, rather then liberated from anything. What are they liberated from?

Like as an american, I don't know what I am liberated from, but I do llok at what's developed here as nothing more then slavery to a system.

You can't do anything without money, and what you can do is limited and specific, so it allows privaleges within the system but not any freedom from it.

But yea this is off topic.
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PostSubject: Re: Liberalism and the Decay of Society: are Humans Imperfect?   Mon Oct 03, 2011 8:21 am

Born against wrote:
Thanks for the welcome Very Happy

I tend to think of developed countries as enslaved to the systems, rather then liberated from anything. What are they liberated from?

Like as an american, I don't know what I am liberated from, but I do llok at what's developed here as nothing more then slavery to a system.

You can't do anything without money, and what you can do is limited and specific, so it allows privaleges within the system but not any freedom from it.

But yea this is off topic.

It may be a little off topic but it is an interesting viewpoint nevertheless.

Compared to a complete absence of governing structures or systems, it sure looks like liberation enslaved us to work the corporate money machine. However, liberation as a spawn of the enlightenment (~18th century) liberated the people from much stricter governing structures that did not allow individual thought or progress; liberation countered the feudal systems that were present at the time. Similarly, liberation is applied to countries that may suffer from dictatorships (i.e Iraq) today. Liberation does not liberate from liberty, it liberates from oppression.
It is noteworthy though, that oppression can take several forms and does not need to be obvious (i.e. corporate slavery in the country of liberty) ... why does oppression rise? Cause it can? Cause there is always one or some who care for the ultimate power? Cause people want "guidance"? What is it?
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PostSubject: Re: Liberalism and the Decay of Society: are Humans Imperfect?   Mon Oct 03, 2011 12:16 pm

wether dictatorships or anything needs liberating has yet to be shown. It seemed like it for a while. Before the discovery of the Americas, europe needed liberation from their ways because they were like we are now...wondering wtf we did with all our resources...

america and democracy seemed great for a while, but that is because we were plowing ahaead full steam to colonize and develop the nation and we had all the resources in the world from metals to timber. There was enough to go around.

Democracy has proved to be a farce. A few years ago the first U.S. president to get busted rigging and cheating the election still became president. How many others weren't busted. When we elect a personm president, we actually elect a ruling culture, probably either a liberal or conservative. It is like having 1,000 dictatots. The one that is elected works for the party not himself or the people. He or she can enact laws that never go away so they remain alot like a dictator.

Example. Richard Nixon, a lying, self serving cheat was elected and started the war on drugs/america.
George bush Jr. cheats in the election and enacts the patriot act and home land security. Long after our cheating presidents terms are over, what they dictated still goes on today and rules our lives.

American democracy and ideas about freedom, and liberty came from observing the native American peoples of New England. The structure of our govt came from europe but all the ideology came from the indians in America.

Did you ever see Dances With Wolves? There is a scene near the begining where the lakota are talking about american soldier(costners role). They're all having a meeting, there are elders warriors children and women present.The medicine man thinks he is there for a divine purpose and wants to find out what it is. The warrior guy is wanting to kill him. The cheif elder, the dictator says top the warrior something like..."Of course no man can tell another man what to do. But if you go get him, please understand what this will bring on all of us.

So the big chief has no power over anyone period, only that he is a respected elder that people trust.

I know about the enlightenment. I studied anthropology a little bit. Anthropology was created for and used in the enlightenment as a war machine. A way to disolve cultures and "liberate" them from their territories and resources for westerners/globalization.

There are still tribes existing today that will not let modernday anthropologist near them because they have the "enlightenment" recorded in their history. Anthropologist would study their social structures and kinship ties so that they could manipulate and extort the people.

It is ironicly because of anthropology that we know for a fact that human nature is if anything, slightly virtuous, not bad, but mostly a reflection of the society and culture it is a part of.
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